LOT-EK Injects New Life Into Shipping Containers

Event: People and Buildings: Thinking Inside the Box
Location: Housing Works Bookstore Café, 01.30.07
Speakers: Giuseppe Lignano & Ada Tolla – Principals, LOT-EK; Marc Levinson, author, The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger
Organizers: The Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP); New York Council for the Humanities

Courtesy LOT-EK

Mobile Dwelling Units (MDU) travel as standard-size containers, expand to reveal furnished interiors, and could be plugged into “vertical harbors” in any city.

Courtesy LOT-EK

Home, gallery, train station, vertical village, museum, portable retail hut, mega-billboard, recycling plant: these are among the novel alternative uses that Giuseppe Lignano and Ada Tolla, founding principals of LOT-EK, have conceived for the thousands of surplus 20- and 40-foot-long standard shipping containers that accumulate like empty shoeboxes in U.S. port cities. Interpreting the containers as adaptable architectural shells rather than inherently defined freight boxes, the partners envision a radically modular landscape as liquid as capital itself.

Their January 30th presentation – part of CUP’s People and Buildings event series – complemented a lecture delivered by the economist Marc Levinson recounting the evolution of the modern shipping container. According to Levinson, a former editor of The Economist and author of a new book on shipping container history, the adoption of standard shipping containers in the 1950s-70s fueled the industrial decline of formerly bustling ports such as Brooklyn. LOT-EK’s designs creatively invert this relationship; in its hands the very same shipping containers become post-industrial building blocks to revitalize the city. The firm is on a mission to discover how many different types of program can be dynamically planted in, around, and between the containers.

One case study is the Mobile Dwelling Unit (MDU), which not only functions as an independent, fully furnished home, but hypothetically plugs in to a vast “vertical harbor,” or high-rise steel rack, in any metropolis. Said Lignano, “Like pixels in a digital image, temporary patterns are generated by the presence or absence of MDUs in different locations along the rack, reflecting the ever-changing composition of these colonies scattered around the globe.” The completed Bohen Foundation gallery and offices on West 13th St. shows how shipping containers can be adapted to create flexible interior volumes. Accommodating an entirely different program, the train station and tower they have proposed for Turin, Italy, is a 1,800-foot-long “programmable billboard” animated by the constant movement of trains, cars, passengers, and shoppers, as well as a giant stream of travel information and advertisements.

Recycling is one of LOT-EK’s goals, but not only in the material sense. Responding to Levinson’s account of endless negotiations over the exact specifications of standard containers, Lignano said he and Tolla would like to “recycle the intelligence and all the effort” spent developing the 8.5-foot-tall, 8-foot-wide steel and aluminum boxes. They also see latent pop-art value in the multi-colored containers. Shipping containers could one day become as ubiquitous in the built environment as they are on the seas and highways.

Gideon Fink Shapiro is a writer and researcher at Gabellini Sheppard Associates, and contributes to several design publications.

Architects Return to School

Event: A New Architecture for a New Education symposium held in conjunction with the exhibition “School Buildings – The State of Affairs: A New Architecture for a New Education”
Location: Center for Architecture, 02.03.07
Speakers: Bruce Barrett – Vice President of Architecture & Engineering, NYC School Construction Authority; Barbara Custer – Principal, Nordstrasse Elementary School, Zürich; Richard Dattner, FAIA – Dattner Architects; Manuela Keller-Scheider – Zürich University of Teacher Education; Daniel Kurz – architectural historian, Zürich Building & Zoning Department; Kelvin Shawn Sealey, EdD – founder, Design Lab for Learning Organizations at Columbia Graduate School for Architecture, Planning and Preservation; Tony Vinzenz – Director, Department of Schools and Sport, City of Zürich; Markus Ziegler – Immobilien-Bewirtschaftung, City of Zürich.
Moderator: David M. Steiner – Dean, Hunter College School of Education
Organizer: AIA New York Chapter Committee on Architecture for Education and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich/ Wohnforum
Sponsors: Holcim, Think Swiss, The Consulate General of Switzerland in New York

Gempeler

Falletsche School, Zurich-Leimback, Switzerland.

Gempeler

American architects and educators might benefit from looking at recent European models and rethinking the fundamentals of educational building design. In Zürich, the educational structure is departing from the traditional “banking” model, where information is “deposited” into students by teachers. According to Tony Vinzenz, Director of the Department of Schools and Sport in Zürich, teaching is evolving into a team effort intended to “tap the individual potential of each child,” a change that demands more flexibility and connection among classrooms. Extended school hours also increases demands on space, and integration of technology challenges the rigid classroom layout of traditional school buildings.

Even though Zürich faces similar problems to NYC, NYC must address the issues on a larger scale. According to Markus Ziegler, of Zürich’s public real estate department Immobilien-Bewirtschaftung, the amount of school space available in Zürich has doubled since 1940, while the number of school children has decreased by 21%. In NYC, the School Construction Authority houses over 1 million children and plans to add 63,000 seats to the city’s schools within the next five years to keep pace with demand. So while clustering classrooms and providing flex space is desirable in new schools, the question remains how New York’s 1,300 existing facilities can adapt to house new teaching models. “Schools change constantly, while the school buildings stay built,” said Ziegler, an idea that architects should seriously consider when designing tomorrow’s schools.

Carolyn Sponza, AIA, is an architect with Beyer Blinder Belle Architects and Planners and is the AIANY Chapter Vice President of Professional Development.

Curating Kahn

Exhibition: Responding to Kahn: A Sculptural Conversation
Location: Yale University Art Gallery, on view through 07.08.07
Curators: Timothy Applebee – M.Arch. candidate, Yale University; Sonali Chakravarti – Political Science Ph.D. candidate, Yale University; Shannon N. Foshe – History of Art B.A. 2006, Yale University; Kate Howe – Graphic Design M.F.A. candidate, Yale University; Harriet Salmon – Sculpture M.F.A. 2006, Yale University; Catherine Sellers – Education Intern, Yale University Art Gallery; Sydney Skelton – History of Art 2007, Yale University; under the direction of Pamela Franks – Curator of Academic Initiatives, Yale University Art Gallery

Elizabeth Felicella

Yale University Art Gallery, Louis Kahn building, first floor; interior view of Responding to Kahn: A Sculptural Conversation exhibition, 2006. (c) 2006 Yale University Art Gallery.

Elizabeth Felicella

Bricks the size of his hands make up the walls. Concrete columns bearing the scars of their creation hold up the suspended ceiling of tetrahedrons. A circular stairwell capped by a dark floating triangle completes the geometry of the space. These are cues we, as student curators, took from the Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG) building for the Responding to Kahn: A Sculptural Conversation exhibition. Connections are made between Louis Kahn’s history and the building while providing a space for conversation between architecture and art.

In representing Kahn’s architecture in the form of a sculpture exhibition, we focused on bringing the visitor to the architect through art. Specifically positioned lights cast the triangular shadows of an Alexander Calder mobile onto the broad cylindrical stairwell behind it. The artwork moves gently with the movement of the building – from door drafts, air conditioning, or passing visitors – connecting elements of Kahn’s vision: the city, the building, and the viewer. Christian Boltanski’s three towers of La fete de Pourim are constructed of biscuit tins that visually mimic the intimately measured bricks of Kahn’s walls.

The concrete columns in the gallery express their construction with imprints of the wood framework – which we saw as translations of Kahn’s physical scars (caused by a fire from his childhood). Likewise, Rachel Whiteread’s Untitled bears the rawness of its creation in her plaster casting, and Lynda Benglis’ Hitch glass sculpture clutches the sand in which it was formed.

Maintaining the life of a building and rejuvenating the spirit of its architect, especially an icon like Kahn, is a challenge. After the recent renovations by Polshek Partnership Architects (see Un-cluttering a Kahn Classic, by Kristen Richards, eOCULUS 07.25.06), the life of YUAG continues, and hopefully we, as curators, have heightened its spirit as well.

Shannon N. Foshe is the Development Associate at the Center for Architecture, and a member of the curatorial team for the Responding to Kahn exhibition.

America’s Favorite Brands Define Architectural History

“When you ask people to select their favorites… they choose buildings that hold a place in their hearts and minds,” said RK Stewart, FAIA, 2007 AIA President, of the recently released America’s Favorite Architecture list. The public poll compiled 150 “best works of architecture” in celebration of the sesquicentennial anniversary of the AIA’s founding. Many of the buildings are what you might expect – a garden variety of classical icons that speak of patriotism and democracy. Most of the buildings are accessible to the public, whether they are hotels, museums, transportation hubs, or memorials. Indicative of the types of buildings included, the Empire State Building tops the list. The list is generally uninteresting to me (as are most survey results), but the fact that only 21 buildings were constructed in the last 10 years does compel me to question why practicing architects are generally unsuccessful at tugging the heartstrings of the general public.

Perhaps it is a good sign that the largest percentage of those 21 recently constructed buildings are located in NY (six in NYC and one in Long Island). However, three are places where people go to shop: the city’s two Apple stores (#53 and #141) and the Time Warner Center (#105). We are a consumer-oriented society, and we spend more time interacting with retail architecture, maybe more than other types of architecture. So it could be good that people are considering the architectural experience rather than an image. Then again, the Hearst Tower (#71) is inaccessible to the public, and the New York Times Building (#68) is still under construction.

Ultimately, I think it all comes down to branding. Name recognition is at the forefront of the public’s and architects’ minds (after all, it was architects that came up with the initial 248 buildings). Currently, corporations are striking a chord more so than the buildings themselves – and that does not bode well for the future of architecture.

Progressive Architecture: 54 Years Young

Event: P/A Awards Party
Location: Center for Architecture – 01.24.07
Organizers: ARCHITECT magazine
Sponsors: Hanley Wood Business Media

Darris James

Ned Cramer (second from left), editor-in-chief of ARCHITECT, poses with members of the University of Arkansas Community Design Center. The team won a Jury Citation for the Good Shepherd Ecumenical Retirement Community.

Darris James

Darris James

(l-r): Teran Evans; Jeremy Edmunds, Assoc. AIA, AIANY Director of Programs and Strategic Planning; Teman Evans; Ryan Clark, Assoc. AIA, 2006 AIANYS Associate Director. The Evans twins are managing partners of Dioscuri and contestants from the first season of HGTV’s “Design Star.”

Darris James

The 54th annual Progressive/Architecture, announced at the Center for Architecture January 24, honors architects and designers whose un-built work varies in scale, from Marc Boutin Architect’s Calgary Centre for Global Community, a 25,000-square-foot community center, to Michael Maltzan Architecture’s 2,500-square-foot Pittman Dowell Residence in La Crescenta, California. Although many of the winning projects have international settings – Aziza Chaouni won for her in-depth analysis and proposals for vacant sites in the old medina of Fez, Morocco, and Boston-based Office dA won for an expansion of the Kuwait Sports Shooting Club – many of the projects are community-oriented.

The University of Arkansas Community Design Center (UACDC) received a Jury Citation for its Good Shepherd Ecumenical Retirement Community in Little Rock, Arkansas. “The benefits of being recognized by the P/A awards include bringing to light a type of planning for an aging community and increased visibility to Arkansas’ struggle with urban planning in a disproportionate economic environment,” according to Aaron Gabriel, project director of the UACDC.

The awards ceremony itself was a modest affair. With the P/A Awards being inherited by ARCHITECT, there was a sense that this patriarch of design awards was a nascent event. Replacing the traditional exhibition that usually accompanies the ceremony, full descriptions of the projects were only available in the free copies of ARCHITECT offered at the event. Even though a slide show of the winners cycled throughout the evening, many attendees were disappointed by the omission of an accompanying exhibition. The ceremony itself was rushed and understated as winners were not invited on stage for recognition. In the end, the ceremony did not live up to the preeminence and prestige that a 54-year-old award program deserves.

IN THIS ISSUE:

• Boerum Hill Grows a Green Urban Show House
• New Spaces Round Out Music Conservatory
• Two Interactive Playgrounds Stretch Kids’ Minds, Muscles
• 30-Story Condo Slated for Brooklyn
• Piazza for SUNY Purchase
• Reopen Airport as Service Center
• NYC IDA Spurs New Office, Industrial Space in Brooklyn
• Survey Predicts Engineer Shortage

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Boerum Hill Grows a Green Urban Show House
Working with developers R & E Brooklyn and Studio A/WASA, Natural Home magazine is converting a circa 1920s Brooklyn brownstone that had been slated for demolition, into the city’s first American Lung Association Health House. Plans call for preserving the existing historic brick commercial façade, while creating two three-bedroom residences.

Designed to meet a high standard of environmental performance, solar panels will provide electricity, and an innovative hybrid solar-thermal and gas-fired system will provide heating and cooling. Eco-friendly materials will include cement made from fly ash, recycled glass countertops, bamboo flooring finished with low-VOC water-based poly, and sorghum stalk kitchen cabinets. In order to be a Health House, a project must meet stringent standards that address moisture and humidity control, energy efficiency, air filtration and ventilation, and materials emissions. In addition, the project will include site inspections during the construction phase and performance testing upon completion. The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2007.

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New Spaces Round Out Music Conservatory

Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners

The multi-functional Ades Performance Space at the Manhattan School of Music.

Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners

The Manhattan School of Music gained two new performance spaces and a residence for the president, completing the school’s plan for a fully functional and centralized campus community on the Upper West Side. The $65 million project, designed by Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, began with the construction of a 19-story multi-use building to house dorms, practice rooms, and a new music library.

Now the school’s campus has the Miller Recital Hall, designed for recitals by faculty and students it is an intimate 1,775-square-foot performance space that seats 151. The multi-functional, 2,080-square-foot Ades Performance Space accommodates 216 persons and allows for multiple configurations for staging informal performances including chamber music, jazz, opera, and musical theater, as well as rehearsal space for large ensembles. The residence, with a penthouse and wrap-around terrace, also serves as an extension of the president’s office and as entertaining space for the institution.

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Two Interactive Playgrounds Stretch Kids’ Minds, Muscles

Ellen Honigstock Architect

The deli component of apple seeds playground.

Ellen Honigstock Architect

Rockwell Group

Burling Slip playground aims to encourage imagination.

Rockwell Group

Imagination Playground, a private/public partnership between the Rockwell Group and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation got a thumbs-up from Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) after receiving necessary approval from the local community board. Billed as a place “where kids will exercise their minds as well as their muscles,” the Rockwell Group’s model, initiated as a pro bono project, adds a rich environment of diverse materials encouraging unstructured “free play” in addition to traditional fixed equipment for physical activity.

The playground, located at Burling Slip adjacent to South Street Seaport, incorporates elements such as climbing ropes, a lookout ramp with telescopes, amphitheater seating, and a multi-level “crow’s nest” that has a double function as storage for loose parts. The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC) provided a grant for the construction of the Playground and the architect and the city are seeking to raise an additional $2 million for an endowment. Construction is slated to begin late 2007.

On West 25th Street near Madison Square Park, two friends, both moms of twins, decided they needed an indoor place for kids and their parents to hang out in the neighborhood. Designed by Ellen Honigstock Architect, apple seeds is a 15,000-square-foot play space, café, and boutique with classrooms where students can learn music, art, cooking, and yoga. The main attraction of apple seeds is its 2,500-square-foot NYC-themed interactive playground created by children’s museum designer, Roto Studios. The playground is divided into three zones – “the neighborhood,” ‘the park,” and “the city,” coinciding with early childhood development.

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30-Story Condo Slated for Brooklyn

Courtesy Clarett Group

Purchase College Student Services Building

Courtesy Clarett Group

Forté, a 30-story residential condo designed by FXFOWLE Architects, will be constructed in the new BAM Cultural District. Containing 108 residences, from studios to three-bedroom apartments, the streamlined glass ribbon façade will house four homes per floor and include gourmet kitchens and luxury amenities.

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Piazza for SUNY Purchase

Kevin Hom + Andrew Goldman Architects

Purchase College Student Services Building

Kevin Hom + Andrew Goldman Architects

Kevin Hom + Andrew Goldman Architects has recently completed a new, $12.6 million student services building for Purchase College. The project is part of a campus master plan conducted by the firm, designed to create a new center for academic and outdoor functions. The 57,000-square-foot glass and brick building has a two-story atrium with a one-stop-shop for student services and a multi-media conference center. The center is located at the end of the newly created Central Campus Mall, a plaza extension consisting of an overpass infill that bridges over an existing roadway, creating a new quad area know as the “Piazza.”

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Reopen Airport as Service Center

Margulies Hoelzli Architecture

The Avitat Westchester

Margulies Hoelzli Architecture

After a 15-month, $9 million renovation that converted its pre-jet age airplane hangar, Avitat Westchester reopened as a modern airport service center at Westchester County Airport. The 21,000-square-foot, two-story lean-to terminal, designed by Margulies Hoelzli Architecture, contains multi-tenant offices, crew facilities, maintenance shops, and storage facilities. Hoping to make the trip from to the aircrafts interesting, the facility has a glass canopy, an atrium, custom stainless steel staircases, aquariums filled with tropical fish, a baby grand piano, and its own Starbuck’s with freshly brewed coffee for pilots and passengers.

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NYC IDA Spurs New Office, Industrial Space in Brooklyn
New York City Industrial Development Agency (IDA), administered by the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), approved financial assistance for the office component of The Center at Albee Square, a mixed-use development in Downtown Brooklyn that will serve as the city’s first major commercial project constructed in the area since a 2004 rezoning. The $60.4 million project is expected to create more than 470 construction jobs over three years and provide office space for about 500 permanent jobs. The IDA Board also approved financing assistance to four industrial companies, an auto parts manufacturer, commercial printer, importer/distributor of groceries, an apparel manufacturer, and a not-for-profit religious school.

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Survey Predicts Engineer Shortage
In time for National Engineers Week 2007, a survey of 175 member firms conducted by the American Council of Engineering Companies of New York (ACECNY), reveals the direction, trends, and challenges the consulting engineering industry expects to face over the next five years. Critical issues include finding and retaining qualified personnel. Currently, 42% of those surveyed said they have enough engineers to meet their needs, and they anticipate this problem to grow. Personnel shortages in civil engineering, including transportation, highway, and bridge engineers, followed by mechanical and electrical engineers, fire safety, structural, and environmental engineers appeared to be of greatest concern to respondents. Topping the list of factors important to retaining professional engineers are higher salaries, more visibility and recognition, mentoring, and job security.

Check out two new website resources for the architecture and planning community:

VIVA2
Launched by the Skyscraper Museum, this is the second in a series of Web projects that present the museum’s archival holdings with an interactive interface. The Visual Index to the Virtual Archive 2 (VIVA2) provides access to more than 1,000 photographs of the construction of the Empire State Building, including workers, machinery, ceremonies, and city scenes. All images can be enlarged, e-mailed, or printed. This spring, the World Trade Center towers will be made available as well.

PlanningWiki
Created to be a general user-contributed encyclopedia, glossary, reference and resource guide, directory, and compendium of best practices, PlanningWiki is intended to be more than just an encyclopedia-like reference guide. The new Wiki will provide a resource for specialized and localized planning knowledge that would otherwise be considered too narrow in scope for encyclopedia-type sites such as Wikipedia and Digital Universe. Anyone can contribute, so spread the word and consider adding an entry or two!

The AIA New York Chapter released its list of 2007 Design Award recipients; 31 winners were selected from over 400 submissions. Architecture Honor Award winners include: Weiss/Manfredi (Olympic Sculpture Park); Diller Scofidio + Renfro (The Institute of Contemporary Art); Steven Holl Architects (Pratt Institute, Higgins Hall Center Wing, and New Residence at the Swiss Embassy); Steven Harris Architects (92 Jane Street); and Foster + Partners (Hearst Tower). Interior Architecture Honor Award winners are Dean/ Wolf Architects (Operable Boundary Townhouse/ Garden) and Della Valle Bernheimer (23 Beekman Place). Project Honor Awards were awarded to Thomas Phifer and Partners (North Carolina Museum of Art) and nARCHITECTS (Windshape).

Michael Kwartler, FAIA, and Carmi Bee, FAIA, will receive the John Hejduk Award from the Cooper Union Alumni Association in April at the Cooper Union Founder’s Day Dinner…Civitas, the citizens’ group dedicated to improving neighborhood quality of life in Manhattan’s Upper East Side and East Harlem, has chosen Metropolis magazine publisher Horace Havemeyer III and editor-in-chief Susan Szenasy as the 2007 recipients of its August Heckscher Award for Community Service and Excellence… The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is the recipient of a grant of $10 million from The Starr Foundation…

Balcony Media, Inc., publishers of art and architecture books and LA Architect magazine, announced that it will launch a new national trade publication, FORM: pioneering design, in June 2007…The Architect’s Newspaper launched a California edition on 02.21.07 with Sam Lubell as the chief editor…

Raymond C. Bordwell, AIA, LEED AP, has joined the Perkins Eastman as a New York City-based principal… Meltzer/Mandl Architects has promoted David G. Carpenter to Associate Principal and Director of Development… David Kriegel, AIA, has been named Managing Principal at Gran Kriegel Associates, a newly named full-service architecture and planning firm originally founded in 1965 as Gran Associates…

Adam Melis

Rick Bell, FAIA, AIANY Executive Director discusses “Grassroots” issues with Congresswoman Nydia M. Velázquez, of New York’s 12th Congressional District, at Grassroots, the AIA’s annual legislative and leadership conference.

Adam Melis

Courtesy New York Public Library

The NYPL Bronx Library Center celebrated receiving LEED certification 01.11.07. (l-r): Michael Alvarez, Bronx Library Center Chief Librarian; Ariella Rosenberg, NYC Mayor’s Office of Operations; Daniel Heuberger, AIA, LEED AP, Datter Architects; Paul LeClerc, Bronx Library Center President; Joyce Lee, AIA, Chief Architect at the City of New York Office of Management and Budget; Richard Fedrizzi, President, CEO, and founding chairman of the U.S. Green Building Council.

Courtesy New York Public Library

Neelesh Jethwa

02.12.07: The 2007 AIANY Design Awards jury discussed the 31 winning entries at a sympoisum at the Center for Architecture (l-r): Benjamin Gianni, School of Architecture, Carleton University, Ottawa (Interiors); Frank Harmon, Frank Harmon Architect, Raleigh (Projects); Jeanne Gang, Studio Gang Architects, Chicago (Projects); Piero Sartogo, Sartogo Architetti Associati, Rome (Interiors); Peter Waldman, University of Virginia, Charlottesville (Projects); Massimiliano Fuksas, Massimiliano Fuksas architetto, Rome (Architecture); Dan Hanganu, Dan S. Hanganu Architects, Montreal (Architecture); and Matthias Sauerbruch, Sauerbruch Hutton, Berlin (Architecture); not present: Debra Lehman-Smith, Lehman Smith McLeish, Washington, DC. 2007 Design Awards Chairman William M. Singer, AIA at the podium.

Neelesh Jethwa

More than 200 art enthusiasts and designers were “wowed” Tuesday night with the official launch of the Art Production Fund’s (APF) new Works on Whatever (WOW) series at the Madeline Weinrib Atelier, ABC Carpet & Home.

Courtesy Art Production Fund

(l-r): Doreen Remen – Co-Founder, Art Production Fund; Diane Hachtman – Northeast Regional Vice President, Durkan Hospitality; Yvonne Force Villareal – Co-Founder, Art Production Fund; Susan Halpern – Northeast Regional Sales Representative, Durkan Hospitality.

Courtesy Art Production Fund

Oculus 2007 Editorial Calendar
if you have ideas, projects, opinions – or perhaps a burning desire to write about a topic below – we’d like to hear from you! Deadlines for submitting suggestions are indicated; projects/topics may be anywhere, but architects must be New York-based. Send suggestions to Kristen Richards.
06.01.07 Fall 2007: Collaboration
09.07.07 Winter 2007-08: Power & Patronage

02.23.07 Submission: The Future of Architecture
The Small Project Practitioners Journal is seeking articles, practice tips, and case studies on architecture of engagement and lessons learned for SPP Journal #40: Leaders or Followers: The Future of the Architecture Profession. The issue will address such questions as what it means to be a community leader and define architecture of engagement. Contact Diane Trevarrow Evans for more information.

02.23.07 Submission: On the Water
As part of the AIA 150 celebration, AIA Seattle seeks examples of innovative waterfront design projects, both built and imagined, from the U.S. and beyond. The designs will hopefully inspire and generate dialogue as part of a community-level campaign focused on the Alaskan Way Viaduct and other waterfront design issues in the region.

03.01.07 Registration: NYCSCA Grants
The New York State Council on the Arts is awarding grants, valued up to $10,000, for projects that relate to architecture, architectural history, landscape architecture, urban and rural planning, urban design, historic preservation, graphic design, and industrial design. The program is particularly interested in innovative ideas being explored outside of traditional practice. Only New York State residents are eligible to apply.

03.02.07 Nomination: Jane Jacobs Medal
The Rockefeller Foundation will award the first annual Jane Jacobs Medal to two individuals whose contributions have significantly shaped the urban environment of New York City. Prizes will total $200,000.

03.15.07 Submission: 2007 AIA St. Louis Architectural Photography Competition
AIA St. Louis has announced the call the call for entries for its annual Photography Competition. The 14 winning images will be exhibited at the 2007 convention and cash prizes will be awarded to the top four prizes. Fifty-two of the images will be used in the 2009 Rizzoli Architectural Engagement Calendar. The competition is open to any/all actively registered architects in the US, Associate AIA members, and student members of AIAS.

03.30.07 Submission: 2007 AIA NYS Convention: Call for Presentation Proposals
Inspired by the 150th Anniversary of the AIA, the theme of the 2007 AIA New York State Convention (10.04.07 – 10.06.07) will be “The Past as Prologue.” Proposals are being accepted for seminar topics that address this theme – or better yet, take it to the next level: to educate design professionals.

04.06.07 Submission: Smart Environments Awards
Metropolis magazine and the International Interior Design Association (IIDA) invite architects and interior design professionals to submit interiors projects that achieve design excellence while promoting human well-being and sustainability. Winning projects will be considered for publication in Metropolis.

04.06.07 Submission: SMPS 2007 Marketing Communications Awards
Open to both members and non-members of the Society of Marketing Professional Services (SMPS), this competition recognizes excellence in 18 different categories of marketing communications by design and building industry firms.

04.15.07 Submission: Lifecycle Building Challenge
Building materials from construction and demolition account for one-third of the total waste produced in the United States each year. This national competition invites students and professionals to submit designs and ideas that provide possible solutions for the disassembly of entire buildings, building components, and/or tools and strategies.

05.04.07 Submission: HPD RFP
The Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) announced an RFP for a mixed-use development comprised of affordable housing, performing arts space, and retail that will be located in the Brooklyn Academy of Music Cultural District. A pre-submission conference will be held on 02.23.07 at 11:30 A.M at HPD, and responses to the RFP are due by hand on 05.04.07 no later than 4 P.M.