An Olympic Feat: A Park Restitches a City

Robert Eisenstat, AIA, Co-chair of the AIANY Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, introduces Jason Prior.

Daniel Fox

Event: London 2012: The Olympics and the Legacy
Location: Center for Architecture, 05.02.12
Speaker: Jason Prior, Chief Executive of Practice for Planning, Design, and Development, AECOM
Organizer: AIANY Transportation and Infrastructure Committee; AIANY Planning and Urban Design Committee
Sponsor: AECOM

For any city, being named host for the Olympic Games is cause for celebration. Winning this bid, however, also poses many long-term challenges. “The Olympic franchise demands a lot, and then they leave, and you’re kind of left holding the baby,” explained Jason Prior, Chief Executive of Practice for Planning, Design, and Development for AECOM, which was engaged to develop the master plan for London’s 2012 games.

AECOM viewed the Olympics as a catalyst for change and offered an urban solution, dubbed the “Legacy Plan,” which considers the park’s impacts on the city 20 to 30 years after the games end. The design “avoids token gestures,” according to Prior, and focuses 75% of funds towards future uses for Londoners. AECOM examined mistakes made in the designs of past Olympic parks, such as huddling venues too close together so they are unable to disperse and become part of the urban fabric. Another astute point he made was: “Why build permanent venues for sports that aren’t even played in your country?”

The East London site selected for the Olympic park was a derelict area plagued by pollution, poverty, crime, and instability. But it did offer a major bonus: access to public transportation infrastructure. The designers located major venues, such as the stadium and aquatics center, closest to these transportation hubs, and connected all buildings with a central parkway. These buildings were designed to their completed state and will be fitted with temporary overlays, such as additional seating that can be removed following the games.

When the security fence comes down, the park will spread out and become folded into the city, stitching the community back together. According to Prior, even temporary events can build the idea of place in an area that previously lacked identity.

The Accessibility Thicket

Peter Stratton explains Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

Daniel Fox

Event: From Plans to Practice: Best Practices in Accessible Design and Construction in Affordable Housing in New York City
Location: Center for Architecture, 4.25.12
Speaker: Peter Stratton, Senior Vice President, Director of Accessibility Compliance and Consulting, Steven Winter Associates
Moderator: Mark Ginsberg, FAIA, LEED AP, Partner, Curtis + Ginsberg Architects
Organizers: AIANY Committees: Building Codes; Design for Aging; Housing; Planning & Urban Design

Peter Stratton’s goal was to give an overview of accessibility issues for affordable housing in New York City, with an emphasis on federal standards. Litigation related to accessibility and compliance with the Fair Housing Act started in the early 2000s, and accessibility reviews continue to expand. For example, the Department of Justice (DOJ) is currently inspecting the top 50 restaurants as listed in Zagat’s for violations. The New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) is now working to make sure buildings it funds comply, including an architect’s certification, on which the AIA New York Chapter has worked with HPD to create a reasonable document.

There are four federal standards enforced by different federal agencies for different reasons, and which, consequently, do not fully relate to one another. Below are short descriptions of each standard and why they matter to architects.

Architectural Barriers Act (ABA)
This first federal law related to accessibility goes back to 1968. It covers accessibility in facilities that are designed, constructed, altered or leased by or on the behalf of the federal government, and requires compliance with the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) which is produced by the United States Access Board; the current version is from 1984.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
It covers all projects, both new construction and rehabilitations, which receive federal funding. The standard for Section 504 is UFAS; it applies to developments of five or more units, and requires a percentage of units to be accessible. Substantial alterations – those comprising 75% of the replacement value of the building – require compliance with new construction rules. Other alterations may require compliance.

American with Disabilities Act (ADA)
Title II covers structures built by state and local governments. Title III covers places of public accommodation and commercial facilities. In multifamily housing, ADA applies to spaces designed to accommodate the general public (i.e. a leasing office). In spaces designed only for residents and their guests, ADA does not apply.

Fair Housing Act
Related to the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which was expanded in 1988 to include people with disabilities and children. Buildings built before 1991 are not required to comply, even if they undergo conversion. There are more than 10 fair housing safe harbors (regulations that the federal government has approved as meeting the Fair Housing Act). NYC’s code, however, is not one. The Act covers all housing with four or more units in a single building, all ground floor units, and all units in elevator buildings.

Finally, one has to comply with local codes, which may have requirements that exceed Federal Standards (i.e. Connecticut has visibility legislation).

So what does this mean for architects designing affordable housing? In sum, all projects need to comply with the local codes. Public spaces and projects built by city and state governments must comply with the ADA; projects built or used by the federal government must comply with ABA; all “ground up” housing built after 1992 must comply with the Fair Housing Act; and if a project receives federal funds (not including tax credits) it must comply with UFAS.

Oculus Book Talk Series

Book Review: Five North American Architects: An Anthology by Kenneth Frampton

Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP)
Lars Müller Publishers, 2012

Kenneth Frampton discusses his work at the 04.30.12 Oculus Book Talk.

Laura Trimble

Kenneth Frampton began his tenure at Columbia University’s GSAPP in 1972. During the subsequent years he not only shaped and impacted his students but his treatise Modern Architecture: A Critical History (1980; revised 1985, 1992, and 2007) reached far beyond the gates of higher learning to influence the most seasoned practitioner. Five North American Architects which includes our Canadian brethren, is a reflection of 21st-century architecture through the work of Stanley Saitowitz (Natoma Architects, San Francisco), Brigitte Shim, Hon. FAIA, and Howard Sutcliffe, Hon. FAIA (Shim-Sutcliffe Architects, Toronto), Rick Joy (Rick Joy Architects, Tucson), John Patkau, AIA, and Patricia Patkau (Patkau Architects, Vancouver), and Steven Holl, FAIA (Steven Holl Architects, New York).

While all five cozily share the pages inside the slim spine of this anthology, one of the things that I found to be most dynamic about this book is how the traits and views espoused by Frampton – “landscape, material, craft, space, light,” in addition to “their propensity for typological invention” – influenced each of these architects so fundamentally. Saitowitz’s seven principles of architecture, and Holl’s five axioms of architecture, which he wrote in Frampton’s honor, crystallize many of the shared philosophies and differences.

There is also something equally valuable to consider when reading Five North American Architects – that under the right vision and tutelage, an educational think tank can be more than a laboratory for students; it can inject energy and new ideas into professional practices at varying stages of their careers. Which brings us back to where we began, with Frampton, who at the age of 80 has achieved what so few in the academic world have not: a bridge of continuance and influence between educator and practitioners.

Each month, the AIANY Oculus Committee presents a Book Talk at the Center for Architecture. Oculus Book Talks highlight a recent publication on architecture or design – presented by the author. The Book Talks are a forum for dialogue and discussion, and copies of the publications are available for sale and signing. Kenneth Frampton was the featured writer on April 30. The next talk takes place on 06.11.12 and features Diana Balmori and Joel Sanders’ Groundwork: Between Landscape and Architecture (Monacelli, 2011).

Oculus Book Talk Series

Book Review: Five North American Architects: An Anthology by Kenneth Frampton

Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP)
Lars Müller Publishers, 2012

Kenneth Frampton discusses his work at the 04.30.12 Oculus Book Talk.

Laura Trimble

Kenneth Frampton began his tenure at Columbia University’s GSAPP in 1972. During the subsequent years he not only shaped and impacted his students but his treatise Modern Architecture: A Critical History (1980; revised 1985, 1992, and 2007) reached far beyond the gates of higher learning to influence the most seasoned practitioner. Five North American Architects which includes our Canadian brethren, is a reflection of 21st-century architecture through the work of Stanley Saitowitz (Natoma Architects, San Francisco), Brigitte Shim, Hon. FAIA, and Howard Sutcliffe, Hon. FAIA (Shim-Sutcliffe Architects, Toronto), Rick Joy (Rick Joy Architects, Tucson), John Patkau, AIA, and Patricia Patkau (Patkau Architects, Vancouver), and Steven Holl, FAIA (Steven Holl Architects, New York).

While all five cozily share the pages inside the slim spine of this anthology, one of the things that I found to be most dynamic about this book is how the traits and views espoused by Frampton – “landscape, material, craft, space, light,” in addition to “their propensity for typological invention” – influenced each of these architects so fundamentally. Saitowitz’s seven principles of architecture, and Holl’s five axioms of architecture, which he wrote in Frampton’s honor, crystallize many of the shared philosophies and differences.

There is also something equally valuable to consider when reading Five North American Architects – that under the right vision and tutelage, an educational think tank can be more than a laboratory for students; it can inject energy and new ideas into professional practices at varying stages of their careers. Which brings us back to where we began, with Frampton, who at the age of 80 has achieved what so few in the academic world have not: a bridge of continuance and influence between educator and practitioners.

Each month, the AIANY Oculus Committee presents a Book Talk at the Center for Architecture. Oculus Book Talks highlight a recent publication on architecture or design – presented by the author. The Book Talks are a forum for dialogue and discussion, and copies of the publications are available for sale and signing. Kenneth Frampton was the featured writer on April 30. The next talk takes place on 06.11.12 and features Diana Balmori and Joel Sanders’ Groundwork: Between Landscape and Architecture (Monacelli, 2011).

In this issue:
• NYC Firms on Teams Selected to Transform DC’s National Mall
• New Art Institute Presents a Gateway between University and City
• Jet-Age Retro at JFK
• Yale University Art Gallery Renovation and Expansion Completed
• A Façade with Infinite Possibilities


NYC Firms on Teams Selected to Transform DC’s National Mall

Constitution Gardens

Courtesy Rogers Marvel Architects & Peter Walker and Partners

Washington Monument Grounds

Courtesy OLIN & Weiss/Manfredi

Union Square

Courtesy Gustafson Guthrie Nichol & Davis Brody Bond

Stretching from the Capitol, past the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial, and over to the Jefferson Memorial, the National Mall, known as “America’s front yard,” is about to get a $700 million makeover. The winning proposals include a performance space, terraces, gardens, restaurants, and an ice skating rink, while considering issues of sustainability, maintenance and operations, and security. Rogers Marvel Architects and Peter Walker and Partners have been chosen to redesign Constitution Gardens, which is east of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Seattle-based Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, partnering with Davis Brody Bond, will redesign Union Square. And Philadelphia-based OLIN and Weiss/Manfredi are in charge of revitalizing the Sylvan Theater, which is southeast of the Washington Monument. The first ribbon cutting is expected to take place in 2016, in time for the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.


New Art Institute Presents a Gateway between University and City

Exterior and garden

Courtesy Steven Holl Architects

First floor galleries

Courtesy Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl Architects’ design for Virginia Commonwealth University’s (VCU) new Institute for Contemporary Art (ICA) was recently unveiled. Clad in pre-weathered satin-finish zinc with clear and translucent glass walls, the 38,000-square-foot institute features a series of flexible programming spaces for the presentation of visual art, theater, music, dance, and film. At the building’s heart is a double-height forum that connects to the ground floor performance space and opens up to the sculpture garden and café. Four galleries allowing for different exhibitions or for one all-encompassing show radiate out from the forum in forked arms, shaping the space of the garden. The three levels of galleries are linked through the open forum, allowing artists to create works that extend across, and visitors to circulate through, the spaces via a variety of paths. With green elements including geothermal wells, green roofs, and glass walls, the project is designed to achieve LEED Platinum certification.


Jet-Age Retro at JFK

(c) Anton Stark

(c) Anton Stark

“Understatedly uptown, unmistakably New York,” is the design theme of Virgin Atlantic’s new Upper Class Clubhouse at JFK. Designed by Slade Architecture, the 10,000-square-foot clubhouse, located in Terminal 4, has full-height views of the jetways and aircraft on the tarmac below. In the lounge’s center is a cloud-shaped cocktail bar enclosed by a diaphanous, curving wall of stainless steel rods and walnut fins that mediate views from and through the space creating distinct sections for an Internet bar, meeting spots, dining, and even a spa. Mid-century Modern classic seating such as the Eames Lounge Chair, Saarinen’s Tulip, Bertoia’s Bird, and Arne Jacobsen’s Swan, as well as other furnishings, are reminiscent of the golden age of jet travel. Slade Architecture added its own modern touch with a custom-made Red Ball Sofa, Pebble Chair, and seats recessed into a perforated metal wall that have proved to be comfy sleeping nooks.


Yale University Art Gallery Renovation and Expansion Completed

Exterior of Yale University Art Gallery: (l-r) Louis Kahn building, Old Yale Art Gallery, Street Hall.

(c) Chris Gardner

New sculpture terrace awaiting installation of work.

(c) Chris Gardner

Old Yale Art Gallery building, view into the European galleries.

(c) Chris Gardner

The Yale University Art Gallery has completed a $135 million renovation and expansion project that began in 1998. Designed by Ennead Architects, the project increases the space occupied by the gallery from one-and-a-half buildings – Louis Kahn’s 1953 Modernist structure, and approximately half of Egerton Swartwout’s 1928 neo-Florentine Gothic Old Yale Art Gallery – to three, encompassing the Kahn building (renovated in 2006), the entire Old Art Gallery, and the contiguous 1866 Street Hall, designed by Peter Bonnett Wight. The project unites the three buildings into a cohesive whole while maintaining the architectural identity of each. A new stairway and elevator unifies circulation, mechanical systems have been upgraded, and the thermal performance of the exterior walls has been improved. A new rooftop structure, clad in zinc and glass and set back from the perimeter of the roof, provides temporary exhibition space and adds a sculpture terrace. The gallery now contains over 64,000 square feet of exhibition space and the installation of art work has begun. The gallery is set to open on December 12, 2012.


A Façade with Infinite Possibilities

Courtesy studioMDA

Located on what was once a 25-foot-wide-by-95-foot-long empty lot in the Tribeca Historic District, a 15,000-square-foot red brick, glass, and metal residential building designed by studioMDA has topped out. The six-story building at 137 Franlin Street contains three two-story condo units with a spandrel panel on the façade acting as the demarcation. The façade design, which complements its neighbors, was informed by combining interest in the nine-square grid and the play of light on the Hudson River at sunset. The architects conceptualized the “dissonant harmony” of the water’s surface to create a sense of randomness and infinite possibility, using Sol LeWitt’s automated drawings as a reference. Four elements were grouped in sets of three to generate a total of 72 possible combinations grouped in to 24 sets of three patterned panels on the exterior. This grouping represents the total set of possible geometries at a certain level of abstraction. Follow this link to watch a video detailing the façade concept.

THIS JUST IN…

Cornell University has chosen Morphosis Architects to design the first academic building, the Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute, on its “CornellNYC Tech” campus on Roosevelt Island. The 150,000 square-foot, academic building, will be a net-zero energy structure, featuring geothermal and solar power and is expected to open in Fall 2017.

The 2012 New York Architects Regatta Challenge (NYARC) will be held this year on the evening of 09.13.12 at the Manhattan Sailing Club in North Cove. Visit the NYARC Facebook page for more information.

Forty historic places located in all five boroughs were announced as finalists competing for $3 million in grants through “Partners in Preservation,” a collaboration between American Express and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The public is invited to vote online for the preservation projects most important to them at Partners in Preservation. The top four vote-getters, to be announced May 22, are guaranteed to receive grants for their preservation projects. An advisory committee of community and preservation leaders will select sites that will receive the rest of the $3 million in grants.

Last week, elected officials in Goshen, NY, voted 11-10 against a resolution to demolish and replace Paul Rudolph’s 1967 Orange County Government Center. Suffering from water-damage, the building has been vacant since September. Plans to tear down the Rudolph building in favor of a new government building proposed by the county executive were quashed, in part because the new building was considered by some to be bland and lacking in character. Boston-based designLAB architects presented a report to the county that detailed how Rudolph’s building can be architecturally and economically renovated. Follow this link for more information on their findings.

In this issue:
2012 Architects in Albany Lobby Day
Student loans got you down?
e-Calendar


2012 Architects in Albany Lobby Day

(l-r) Mary Burke, FAIA, Jill Lerner, FAIA, Joseph Aliotta, AIA, and Susan Chin, FAIA, in Albany.

Jay Bond

On 05.01.12 AIANY sent representatives to AIA New York State’s (AIANYS) Architects in Albany Lobby Day. 2012 AIANY President Joseph J. Aliotta, AIA, led a group of Chapter leaders and NYC-based practitioners: AIANY President-elect Jill N. Lerner, FAIA; AIANY Executive Director Rick Bell, FAIA; 2012 AIANYS Regional Directors President Anthony P. Schirripa, FAIA, IIDA, and Susan Chin, FAIA; 2012 AIANYS Board Member Mary A. Burke, FAIA; Terrence E. O’Neal, AIA; Venesa Alicea, AIA; and 2012 AIANY Board Member Illya Azaroff, AIA. The day’s meetings were organized by AIANY Policy Director Jay Bond, AIA, who also attended.

It was a busy day in Albany: appointments started with the Office of NYS Senator Thomas K. Duane, a longtime friend and supporter of the work of Center for Architecture. AIANY also met with staff of Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and NYS Assembly Member Deborah Glick, who, as chair of the Higher Education Committee, oversees licensing of the professions; NYS Senator Liz Krueger; the staff of Assembly Member Keith L.T. Wright and Senator Adriano Espaillat. This was our first meeting with a number of Manhattan legislators, and they were very receptive to our agenda. This trip to Albany was important because the Chapter pushed for vital issues: Statute of Repose and the Good Samaritan Act. The lack of the former puts New York architects and designers at a competitive disadvantage with our colleagues in other states, and without the second piece of legislation architects are unable to volunteer professional services during times of crisis or catastrophe.

The Chapter emphasized its concerns over our state’s lack of a statute of repose. Currently, 48 states and the District of Columbia have some sort of statute of repose for design professionals, while architects in New York State have to maintain their insurance into retirement. (Although there is a three year statute of limitations on actions brought by an owner or client, architects are answerable to third party claims for an indefinite period after project completion). AIANY advocates a 10-year limitation on third-party claims, recognizing that the design professional has no control over a property after construction is complete. The Chapter wanted elected officials to understand that there is a point when a building goes from being well-designed to well-maintained, and that is the point when the architect should no longer be liable.

The Chapter also addressed the Good Samaritan Act, which would allow engineers and architects to provide services in times of emergency without fear of legal action. All of the legislation mentioned are in various states of progress in the Senate and the Assembly, and it’s not clear how far they will get before the session ends in June. They are working with colleagues from around the state to get traction on the priorities. If there are particular pieces of legislation either before the state legislature or the New York City Council that were not mentioned here, please feel free to bring them to the Chapter’s attention. If you have the opportunity to see your State Assembly Members or Senators and they are co-sponsors of these important bills, take a moment to thank them for their support. If they are not sponsors, please ask them to consider joining the bills. More details on these bills, along with information on bills opposed, appear here.

Student loans got you down?
Graduates of all stripes – from BAs to MBAs to M.Archs – are graduating with more student debt than ever before. According to the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, outstanding student loan debt has surpassed $1 trillion, replacing credit card debt as the largest source of household debt excluding mortgages. It’s for this reason that AIA National and the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) recently called for Congress to pass legislation that will offer debt assistance to interns and architects if they donate their services to their communities and elsewhere. The legislation includes architecture school graduates in the same programs that apply to other graduates. Read more about the important initiative here.

eCALENDAR
eCalendar includes an interactive listing of architectural events around NYC.

Center for Architecture Gallery Hours and Location
Monday-Friday: 9:00am-8:00pm, Saturday: 11:00am-5:00pm, Sunday: CLOSED
536 LaGuardia Place, Between Bleecker and West 3rd Streets in Greenwich Village, NYC, 212-683-0023

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

AIANY Design Awards 2012

On view 04.19–05.31.2012

V’SOSKE Rugs by Architects: Architecture in Transition, 1979-1993

On view beginning 05.14–05.28.2012

Michael Graves, Rug #2, 1980

Aspiring Museum Educator Talks about Her Internship at CFAF

Claire Buckley guides Family Day participants through the Center for Architecture’s exhibitions.

Catherine Teegarden

Second graders participate in Buckley’s “Architecture in the Middle East” gallery program.

Catherine Teegarden

Eveline Chang, Program and Marketing Manager at the Center for Architecture Foundation (CFAF), spoke with Claire Buckley about her experience interning at CFAF.

EC: Why were you interested in interning at CFAF?
CB: I was looking for a well-established, smaller-scale institution where I could gain museum-based teaching experience and participate in different aspects of museum programming. I was particularly attracted to the hands-on and participatory approach of student programs at the Center. Finally, I felt that the mission of CFAF aligned well with my own developing beliefs.

EC: What were some of the rewarding aspects of your internship?
CB: The opportunity to develop my own FamilyDay@theCenter and StudentDay@theCenter programs were incredibly rewarding and beneficial. Through creating, booking, and teaching the programs I gained valuable firsthand experience in the field of museum education. Furthermore, I appreciated working closely with the education staff as they provided immediate feedback and support throughout this process.

EC: What are some of the challenging aspects of your internship?
CB: I do not have a background in architecture, so the internship proved a continuous learning experience as I worked to deepen and expand my architectural knowledge. Being surrounded by the Center’s galleries and the CFAF staff, I was inspired to absorb as much as I could during this experience.

EC: Tell us more about the program that you developed and memorable highlights from that experience.
CB: My StudentDay@theCenter program focused on the Center’s exhibitions about architecture in the Middle East. School groups looked closely at a selection of buildings, considering how the qualities of a place, such as climate and resources, affect local architecture. One detail we explored is the use of screening as a way to diffuse light and create shade. During the workshop, students made their own paper screens and then tested their designs by shining a flashlight through them to see the effect of the screen. It was incredibly enjoyable to see the children’s reactions as they admired their unique patterns projected on the wall.

EC: How has your experience related to your studies at the Bank Street College of Education?
CB: This internship has provided an avenue to apply what I have learned and observed in my graduate program at Bank Street. I have come to better understand the role of the museum educator, as well as the ways in which schools and museums can partner to create valuable and meaningful experiences for our students.

EC: What are your plans after graduation?
CB: I am committed to pursuing a career involving museum education. Thanks to my experience at the CFAF and my studies at Bank Street, I am excited about future possibilities in this field.

There are many ways to get involved with CFAF, including volunteering and interning. CFAF will be holding its first annual Guess-A-Sketch! A Benefit for the Center for Architecture Foundation on 5.22.2012 at the Center for Architecture. For more information, please visit www.cfafoundation.org.

The Society of American Architects New York Council announced the 2012 Celebration of Architecture & Design Awards winners, including Special Awards: Visionary City Landscape Award, the High Line by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro; Urban Contextual Award, The Dillon by Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects; Architectural/Technological Innovation Award, Metal Shutter Houses by Shigeru Ban Architects + Dean Maltz Architect; Excellence in Civic Architecture Award, FDNY Marine Company 1 Firehouse by CR Studio Architects

…Awards of Excellence: Beach Walk House by SPG Architects, 48 Bond Street by Deborah Berke & Partners, and VIP, Men’s Residence by WASA/Studio A (Housing); Partnership for the Homeless by Richard Ayotte Architect, Saratoga Community Center by George Ranalli, Architect, and City University of New York, Medgar Evers College, Academic Building by Ennead Architects (Educational & Institutional); Uniqlo by Gensler and Twenty Five Lusk by CCS Architecture (Commercial); Horizon Media by Architecture + Information (Interior Design); Rado Redux by Peter Gluck & Partners, and Kirkman Lofts by Scarano Architects (Rehabilitation & Remodeling); Newtown Creek Concept Master Plan by Perkins+Will (Conceptual or Theoretical Projects); Kuwait University Teaching School by Perkins+Will, Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant by Ennead Architects, and The Greatest Grid and South Street Seaport Museum by Cooper Joseph Studio (Sustainable Design); Ashburton Housing Complex by Pablo S. Almeida, Assoc. AIA, and Container House by Indira Fuentes (Student)…

…Awards of Merit: Atlantic Terminal Complex and Trenton Transit Center by di Domenico + Partners, Department of Homeless Services, Prevention Assistance and Temporary Housing by Ennead Architects and Hamilton Grange Teen Center by Rice+Lipka Architects (Educational & Institutional); Eastside Residence by Ronnette Riley Architects, Cooper Square by Desai Chia Architects, Central Park Residence by Shelton, Mindel + Associates, and Apella by Bentel & Bentel Architects (Interior Design); TWA Terminal by Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and New York City Center by Ennead Architects (Rehabilitation & Remodeling); NRDC Strategic Plan & Prototype by Croxton Collaborative Architects (Sustainable Design); and Inter-weave by Yeugeniy Mekhtiyev & Sam Shneyer (Student)…

…Awards of Honor: Dutchess Co. Private Residence by Sen Architects (Housing); Natural History Museum of Utah by Ennead Architects (Educational & Institutional); New York School of Interior Design by Gensler, Spruce Street School by Swanke Hayden Connell Architects, W 24 Loft by Desai Chia Architecture, SoHo Penthouse Residence and Historic Fifth Avenue Residence by Shelton, Mindel + Associates, and Hirsch Apartment by Richard Ayotte, Architect (Interior Design); Liberty Theatre by Swanke Hayden Connell Architects, Brooklyn Navy Yard by Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, and London Terrace by Howard Zimmerman (Rehabilitation & Remodeling); Osong Bio-Valley City Plan by Perkins+Will (Conceptual or Theoretical Projects); Casa Torcida by SPG Architects (Sustainable Design); Recess Lav by Desai Chia Architecture (Product Design); Malleable Nesting by Yeugeniy Mekhtiyev & Sam Shneyer; Flow Lounge by Eni Kodhima; Leaf Bus Stop by Raymond Jimenez; Production House by Ermir Gjoka; HH House by Florian Gjoka; and H.I.B.A.-tat disaster relief shelter by Erik Jester, Hiba Nafe, & Long Ruan (Student)…

The Historic Districts Council (HDC) will present its annual Grassroots Preservation Awards to The Green-Wood Cemetery; Parkway Village Historical Society; The Coalition to Save Manufacturers Hanover Trust; West End Preservation Society;

NYC Council Member Albert Vann, 36th District – Friend in High Places; DNAinfo – Friend from the Media; and Susan Henshaw Jones – Mickey Murphy Award…

Winners of the USITT Architecture Awards program for 2012 include an Honor Award for The AT&T Performing Arts Center Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre by REX | OMA with Associate Architect Kendall Heaton Associates, and Merit Awards for

the Francis Marion University Performing Arts Center by Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture with Associate Architect FW Architects; New York City Center by Ennead Architects; Dancing Water Theater at City of Dreams by Pei Partnership Architects with Executive Architect P&T Group; and Santa Barbara Bowl by Handel Architects with Executive Architect DesignARC

I.M. Pei, FAIA, celebrated his 95th birthday on 04.26.12…The New Museum announced that Maya Lin will be featured as this year’s Visionary speaker…Pratt Institute will award honorary degrees to Ai Weiwei and Santiago Calatrava

The New York School of Interior Design presented 2012 Green Design Awards to Gensler, Design of Interior Spaces; Lutron Electronics, Interior Products; The Related Companies, Development/Real Estate; and NYC Green Codes Task Force, Advocacy/Community…

Barry Bergdoll, MoMA’s Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, has been named a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences…

The Society of American Architects New York Council announced the 2012 Celebration of Architecture & Design Awards winners, including Special Awards: Visionary City Landscape Award, the High Line by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro; Urban Contextual Award, The Dillon by Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects; Architectural/Technological Innovation Award, Metal Shutter Houses by Shigeru Ban Architects + Dean Maltz Architect; Excellence in Civic Architecture Award, FDNY Marine Company 1 Firehouse by CR Studio Architects

…Awards of Excellence: Beach Walk House by SPG Architects, 48 Bond Street by Deborah Berke & Partners, and VIP, Men’s Residence by WASA/Studio A (Housing); Partnership for the Homeless by Richard Ayotte Architect, Saratoga Community Center by George Ranalli, Architect, and City University of New York, Medgar Evers College, Academic Building by Ennead Architects (Educational & Institutional); Uniqlo by Gensler and Twenty Five Lusk by CCS Architecture (Commercial); Horizon Media by Architecture + Information (Interior Design); Rado Redux by Peter Gluck & Partners, and Kirkman Lofts by Scarano Architects (Rehabilitation & Remodeling); Newtown Creek Concept Master Plan by Perkins+Will (Conceptual or Theoretical Projects); Kuwait University Teaching School by Perkins+Will, Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant by Ennead Architects, and The Greatest Grid and South Street Seaport Museum by Cooper Joseph Studio (Sustainable Design); Ashburton Housing Complex by Pablo S. Almeida, Assoc. AIA, and Container House by Indira Fuentes (Student)…

…Awards of Merit: Atlantic Terminal Complex and Trenton Transit Center by di Domenico + Partners, Department of Homeless Services, Prevention Assistance and Temporary Housing by Ennead Architects and Hamilton Grange Teen Center by Rice+Lipka Architects (Educational & Institutional); Eastside Residence by Ronnette Riley Architects, Cooper Square by Desai Chia Architects, Central Park Residence by Shelton, Mindel + Associates, and Apella by Bentel & Bentel Architects (Interior Design); TWA Terminal by Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and New York City Center by Ennead Architects (Rehabilitation & Remodeling); NRDC Strategic Plan & Prototype by Croxton Collaborative Architects (Sustainable Design); and Inter-weave by Yeugeniy Mekhtiyev & Sam Shneyer (Student)…

…Awards of Honor: Dutchess Co. Private Residence by Sen Architects (Housing); Natural History Museum of Utah by Ennead Architects (Educational & Institutional); New York School of Interior Design by Gensler, Spruce Street School by Swanke Hayden Connell Architects, W 24 Loft by Desai Chia Architecture, SoHo Penthouse Residence and Historic Fifth Avenue Residence by Shelton, Mindel + Associates, and Hirsch Apartment by Richard Ayotte, Architect (Interior Design); Liberty Theatre by Swanke Hayden Connell Architects, Brooklyn Navy Yard by Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, and London Terrace by Howard Zimmerman (Rehabilitation & Remodeling); Osong Bio-Valley City Plan by Perkins+Will (Conceptual or Theoretical Projects); Casa Torcida by SPG Architects (Sustainable Design); Recess Lav by Desai Chia Architecture (Product Design); Malleable Nesting by Yeugeniy Mekhtiyev & Sam Shneyer; Flow Lounge by Eni Kodhima; Leaf Bus Stop by Raymond Jimenez; Production House by Ermir Gjoka; HH House by Florian Gjoka; and H.I.B.A.-tat disaster relief shelter by Erik Jester, Hiba Nafe, & Long Ruan (Student)…

The Historic Districts Council (HDC) will present its annual Grassroots Preservation Awards to The Green-Wood Cemetery; Parkway Village Historical Society; The Coalition to Save Manufacturers Hanover Trust; West End Preservation Society;

NYC Council Member Albert Vann, 36th District – Friend in High Places; DNAinfo – Friend from the Media; and Susan Henshaw Jones – Mickey Murphy Award…

Winners of the USITT Architecture Awards program for 2012 include an Honor Award for The AT&T Performing Arts Center Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre by REX | OMA with Associate Architect Kendall Heaton Associates, and Merit Awards for

the Francis Marion University Performing Arts Center by Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture with Associate Architect FW Architects; New York City Center by Ennead Architects; Dancing Water Theater at City of Dreams by Pei Partnership Architects with Executive Architect P&T Group; and Santa Barbara Bowl by Handel Architects with Executive Architect DesignARC

I.M. Pei, FAIA, celebrated his 95th birthday on 04.26.12…The New Museum announced that Maya Lin will be featured as this year’s Visionary speaker…Pratt Institute will award honorary degrees to Ai Weiwei and Santiago Calatrava

The New York School of Interior Design presented 2012 Green Design Awards to Gensler, Design of Interior Spaces; Lutron Electronics, Interior Products; The Related Companies, Development/Real Estate; and NYC Green Codes Task Force, Advocacy/Community…

Barry Bergdoll, MoMA’s Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, has been named a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences…